Welcome to Cranky Puppy Farm!

This blog belongs to two Gen X-er's smackdab in downtown Kansas City where we've been renovating and decorating two old Victorians built in the 1890's. Our life is filled with 3 demanding Pomeranians (1 of them cranky, of course), honking cars, noisy neighbors and the hustle and bustle of city life but we dream of the day when we can move to our 40-acre farm and hear nothing but the wind and the cows next door. Until then, we're chronicling our triumphs and mishaps here as we try to garden and preserve on 2 city lots, raise chickens, and learn all those things we should have learned from our grandparents. Welcome to our world - we hope you'll stay awhile!

This Is Rural Missouri

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Yesterday morning found J. and I at an auction in Pleasant Hill, Missouri about 4 miles north or Harrisonville off Route 291.  The auction was a hoarder's dream and most of it looked like it hadn't been taken care of.  While I waited for J. to big on some tools, I amused myself with a box of "Successful Farming" magazine from the 1950's.  Had we stuck around longer, I would have bought them and had great fun with the content here, but we didn't stick around.
 
But what was pleasant about this little auction in Pleasant Hill was the opportunity for me to get up close and personal with an exquisite example of the charming old barns that dot our great state. 


She has obviously seen better days, but she's absolutely captivating.
 
 
Just look at that roof line.  And the lightning rods at the top!


I love the horseshoe over the doorway.  Apparently, I wasn't the only one mesmerized by this old barn's charm, because I could hear children playing and singing inside the barn, but I wasn't daring enough to fold myself through that child-sized door and go inside. 

 
The property was for sale as well because the elderly owners were moving into town.  I overheard an old-timer say that an inspector had looked at the old farmhouse and recommended that it be torn down.  I certainly hope the barn doesn't meet the same fate. 
 
Shared with Weekly Top Shot and Barn Charm

13 comments:

  1. Very cool :) Now don't you wish you had that box of magazines? I'm guessing some things have changed since the 50's as far as being a successful farmer!

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  2. such a great barn. i love the roof. (:

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  3. Wow nice find! Bet the farm couple are a little sad to be leaving the home place. Love the barn..hope it remains standing!

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  4. What a neat old barn- I hope they don't tear it down.

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  5. Neat old barn! I hope someone buys it who loves it and fixes it up.

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  6. I love the old rustic barns and it's sad to see them at the end of their lives. Hope this barn can be saved!

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  7. Wonderful old barn. Kinda like us as we age, sagging here and there, but still hanging together as best we can. I'm sure that auction is a sad day for the farmer and he's not happy about moving into town. His wife, now, may be a different story.

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  8. Absolutely captivating, indeed! Love it & love that rusty roof! Sure wish there had been someone around to help the elderly couple care for the place, because you know it probably broke their hearts that they couldn't themselves, anymore.

    Thanks for sharing this beautiful old barn w/ us at Barn Charm =)

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  9. Sad and saggy but still full of charm.

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  10. Wonderful barn and your story made me happy and then a bit sad. Sad that a couple could work hard, spend their lives in a place, and then someone unattached says, 'tear it down.' Thanks for sharing on Weekly Top Shot #48!

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  11. Hurts to see the old barns in that shape, doesn't it? It bohers me, too.

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  12. Oh, I so want to sneak inside and see the view within...love the shot looking up the roof!

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